What to Put on Your Resume if You Have No Experience

What to Put on Your Resume if You Have No Experience

A successful resume is detailed, curated, and relevant for the job that you want to apply for. But for those starting a new career or people fresh out of university, having no demonstrated work experience can seem daunting, especially when competing with experienced professionals (and glowing resumes to match!). However, no experience does not mean you won’t be successful in toward your dream career. Here are our top tips on sprucing your resume game up. Before you know it, what begins as a blank Word document will be a glowing Resume to showcase the best of you in a meaningful way.

 

Making resume for fresh graduates

1. Internships

For people with no professional work experience, consider completing an internship. Internships are an advantageous way to gain the basic level of skills and knowledge that you need for meeting entry-level employment in the industry of your choice. Internships require a level of commitment and a development of expertise that holds credibility in the eyes of potential employers. During an internship, your progress will be supported by industry mentors who can give you the perspective you need to understand your strengths and weaknesses better before you enter the workforce. Internships assist in developing your independence and increase the level in which you can successfully complete tasks and projects. Learning to integrate yourself within a team, with colleagues and within the company culture are also benefits of internships. Overall, those who complete an internship find themselves attaining personal growth in matters of self-confidence, self-efficacy, and real-world experience in their chosen field.

2. Volunteer experience

Have you volunteered in the community for a charity or given your valuable free time to a cause? Having volunteer experience can provide employers with an insight into the type of person that you are. For many people, volunteering is a selfless act and demonstrates that you are seeking engagement with a higher purpose toward others. Volunteering can also be across industries: for example, that local festival you volunteered for can come in handy for a future job in event planning and management. Putting volunteer experience on a resume if you have no prior experience can highlight your ability to work within a team, work across diverse contexts and causes, and that you have an interest or passion that makes you a unique person.

3. Education

Finding jobs for students with no experience can be tricky if you are you still in high school, university, or in a vocational course that will give you certification in a marketable skill. Whether you’ve completed your studies or not, having your education listed on your resume is crucial. For employers, this signifies that you are competent in literacy and numeracy skills. In the case of university degrees or vocational certifications, it means that you meet the nationally held requirements of knowledge and understanding within a specific industry.

4. Highlight your transferrable skills – and provide evidence!

Transferrable work skills are invaluable, as jobs require a level of flexibility across all industries. So if you have proficiency in Microsoft Suite, or love the energy that comes with honing your skills in collaboration and teamwork settings, then list these on your resume. Critically, skills in both written and oral communication are necessary to establish in a resume if you have no prior professional experience. The ability to think critically on the job, along with problem solving capabilities, are two examples of transferrable skills that you can demonstrate on your resume. It is not guaranteed that even the people with the most professional experience are willing to develop these skills to a desirable standard!

piles of resumes on the table

If you are entering a new career and have minimal or no experience at all to show on a resume, then there are ways that you can. Regardless of the amount of professional experience someone has, all companies require employees to undergo some form of induction. This be a period of workplace training or supervision to ensure that they are working in accordance with the responsibilities of the role. If you have no experience but you are dedicated to learning more about the necessary skills for the job, then this enthusiasm is a genuine strong point that will make you a memorable and respected person over those who are experienced but disinterested.Overall, your potential as an employee is a valuable asset to a company – in fact, some companies see no or minimal professional experience on a resume as a positive, in that they can train you in accordance with the vision and/or method of their company. Don’t fret if you have no experience, as there are always meaningful and relevant details in life that you can draw upon in your resume.

If you are interested in getting experience to help boost your resume, then consider checking out our Premium Internship Program, or for personalised resume tips and tricks, view our K22 Mentorship Program.

 

How a Mentor Can Help Your Career

We all know the struggle and overwhelming nerves when entering a new career without the right help, guidance or connections to show you the ropes. Luckily, a mentor can help in any situation to make your transitions into new stages of your career smoother! A mentor is similar to a colleague who you would treat as a role model with invaluable guidance to help you advance through your career path. They have all the right insight from their previous years of knowledge and experience to show you how to avoid the mistakes you might make when first starting out. They’ll show you how to navigate through unfamiliar work situations, advice for dealing with burn out, or direct you towards career opportunities which newbies may not be aware of. Mentors have a higher workplace status than you and can provide you with all the necessary training and development to accelerate your career.

Finding a Mentor

Finding a Mentor

A work mentor is crucial to any stage of your career- whether you’re searching for your next role, adjusting to a new job or trying to gracefully leave a job. A lot of companies offer mentorship programs to connect you with people in your field of study or department. Alternatively, you can seek out a mentor by reaching out to your professional networks at school; University, or online listings for job coaches. Your peers and teachers may even be great choices to be fill-in helpers if you are struggling – but ideally, anyone with several years of experience ahead of you can be a great fit.

Expand Your Strengths

Acknowledge Your Shortcomings

Mentors offer a valuable and insightful perspective on how you handle challenges or solve problems. Don’t forget, they’ve been where you have been before. Their past experiences can inform you on what is holding you back from climbing the career ladder, and how to remedy your limitations. Your flaws may not always be obvious to you but for someone with intuition and industry know-how, they can be quickly pinpointed. Having a strong relationship with your mentor will make it easy and comfortable for you to speak about your weaknesses without it feeling like a daunting confession or exposing setback, as opposed to telling a boss or supervisor.

Expand Your Strengths

Acknowledging your strengths goes hand in hand with being aware of your shortcomings. You should know what you’re best at doing as these are usually habits or tasks you feel most proud of completing. You may even have talents you may not

realise! A mentor who’s seen countless people complete tasks you’re currently tackling, will have an eye for how the best of the best perform certain roles, and can advise you of any potential skills you possess that would be good for certain roles. By working alongside these career coaches, you’ll be building upon your skills and knowledge to upgrade your performance at work. Better yet, a mentor can recognise potential in any current skills that you have to help you improve and create valuable strengths out of.

Reinvigorate Interest and Energy

A key duty of your mentor is to motivate and help you fuel your passion for your career. With the right guidance and affirmations, they can inspire you to achieve your short and long-term goals, and advance your career. If you ever feel complacent or burnt out, a mentor can reinvigorate your interest and energy towards your role, so you don’t dread coming to work each day. This can include passing on information about an upcoming workshop relevant to your career which might spark interest in a topic you might have forgotten or overlooked previously. Alternatively, they might even suggest you take time off to help you find time to reflect and reconnect with your enjoyment at work. Either way, anyone is susceptible to burn out, so having a mentor at hand as a safety net to guide you through your low moments can not only save your career, but give you the push you need to be better at your job than ever before.

Learn Critical Insights

With years of experience, mentors have a bank of knowledge to share in regards to the professional world, your industry, or simply where the best coffee around the building is. You can consider them as a friend who will catch you up on the latest industry insights, cross-department news and maybe just to help you with homework. Australian employers appreciate newcomers who can champion a professional discipline and initiative, which you can model from your mentor. There’s always more to learn and having an advisor who’s full of knowledge is very beneficial.

Juggling Tough Choices

The third person insight of a mentor will give you insight on how you can handle difficult decisions or work situations you may not be able to take on by yourself. You might not always have the opportunity to share personal details or issues with your other colleagues, but your mentor is very much like a buddy you can discuss your feelings or mental health with. They’re a safe zone to debate topical issues and opinions or just for you to vent to without the fear of being judged while you talk it out. In the end, they’ll give you qualified advice on how to make your decisions or come to a conclusive opinion if you happen to be tossing up between difficult choices such as choosing between job offers.

Networking With Qualified Professionals

If you are new to the industry, you will probably need someone to help you find an ‘in’. There’s no better way to do this than to expand and diversify your professional network, and a mentor will have access to an entirely new and different network you aren’t familiar with if you are transitioning out of University. Mentors will help you find connections with the most qualified, relevant and knowledgeable individuals who can help you access niche opportunities and wisdom to further your career and achieve your goals.

Networking With Qualified Professionals

Final Takeaways

Maintaining a healthy and successful relationship with a career mentor is incredibly enriching and productive. You never know when you might hit a low point or be in dire need of guidance in unfamiliar situations, and a mentor is a trusty supporter who can give you new perspectives, help you build on your strengths, deliver relevant industry news to you and expand your professional network. You’re expanding your career options and reach in ways you wouldn’t have imagined. So start seeking out a coach who is the right fit for you to help you navigate job experiences and enhance your workplace performance.

Here at PGP Australia, we have mentors and career coaches with years of industry insight and experience who are all passionate about kick-starting the careers of the future workforce of Australia. Via our K22 Mentorship Program, participants can receive a personalised service and advice on everything Job Search, Resume, Application, Interview and Internship – related. Get in touch with us on our Contact Us page for more information on this program.

Bouncing back after a Job Rejection

How to Bounce Back After an Internship or Job Rejection

So you’ve studied the history of the business you’ve applied for, completed all the internship or job interview prep and maybe even went for a coffee with one of the employees you coincidentally befriended at the workplace. A week later and you’ve received an email noticing you that you weren’t selected to fill the internship or job role. Rejection in any form can understandably sting a fair bit- but there is more to learn than to lose in these difficult times. Now is not the time to build up your insecurities by telling yourself you weren’t good enough for that internship or for that job, but to set new goals for yourself to better prepare yourself for the next hurdle. To make the most of a closed door, we’ve compiled a list of ways you can turn a disheartening experience into a motivational one.

Rejection

Separate Yourself From the Situation

Recruiters have to sift through countless resumes, conduct numerous interviews and tiringly select a small fraction of applicants to hire for that internship or job. The fact a hiring manager considered your Resume and reached out to you to schedule an interview is impressive within itself, and you should acknowledge those small achievements as many others didn’t receive this privilege. By taking on this new perspective, you’ll significantly diminish the feeling of rejection. A healthy and positive strategy to overcome your disappointment is to step back from your screen to celebrate making it that far in the intern or job hiring process.

Bounce Back After an Internship or Job Rejection

Don’t Take It Personally

You’re a very accomplished, qualified and talented person, and an internship or job offer rejection is not a measure of your professional worth. It is important that you tell yourself this in times of hardship because your skills and knowledge are not minimised by a small setback. When hiring managers decide to pursue other candidates, they are taking into consideration the needs of the business project or work-wise, the skills needed at the time, and other criteria which you cannot control. Don’t take the defeat as a personal attack! It is very easy to scrutinise yourself for not ‘making it’ to the next internship or job round, but one must remember that recruiters also have a tough job of sorting through an endless list of criteria, so don’t be too quick to blame yourself. Sometimes, it’s good to remind yourself that if they decide you’re not the best fit for their business as an intern or employee, you’re better off applying your skills elsewhere.

You’re Not Alone

It helps to reassure yourself that it’s not an uncommon experience among students and other job ready individuals to face a job rejection. You can try reaching out to others with this shared experience who can empathise with you and provide relevant advice. Remember that everyone at some point – yes even Recruiters have been in the same position as you. Mutual support through enduring similar situations can help propel one another further along your job search journey. In today’s competitive job market, it’s possible for hundreds of people to experience job rejections all at once for the same role.

Thank Your Interviewer The Same Day

Maintaining a positive outlook after a job rejection is very crucial in keeping perspective. This way, you remain poised and realistic by not letting any negative feelings accumulate. Sending a thank you email the day of, or following day, will uphold a positive impression on the employer who may still be consolidating a reserve list of candidates to revise a week later for any other internship or job positions. We recommend you reach out to not only the employer, but the specific interviewer you had the pleasure of spending the morning or afternoon with. Everyone plays a challenging role from either end of this business deal and it’s good to show them some gratitude and appreciation for meeting with you. This personal connection will allow you to find job leads in the future if any opportunity arises!

Don’t Burn Bridges

Staying in touch with prospective employers and the company will keep doors open for you even if they seem closed. Having personal connections with these networks might lead to the attainment of internships or jobs down the line, or provide you insights on upcoming events to develop your career journey. Taking the proactive approach to nurture professional relationships will build your confidence, especially since you’ll never know when your paths may cross again.

Learn From The Experience

You may find that after being rejected, you’re left on a vague note without enough information or feedback from the interviewer to help you improve your internship or job application skills. To alleviate any doubts you’ve imposed upon yourself, ask yourself introspective questions and clearly recount every stage of your application to see where you can fill out the gaps in your skillset. Some questions you can ask yourself are:

  • What could you have done differently?
  • What could be missing in your resume?
  • What did you learn from the interview stage?
  • How effectively did you express yourself when making first impressions with the interviewer?
  • Did you describe and convey your strengths well enough?
Bounce Back After an Internship or Job Rejection

Being introspective and taking initiative to plan corrective action will enable you to fix any mistakes and polish up your interviewing ability. Targeting these weaknesses will in turn give you the real competitive advantage in your next application. You don’t want to repeat any mistakes in the future or you’d actually waste your time delivering sub-par interview performances. Rejection can be difficult to overcome in the short term but the push-back feeling you get from it is an invaluable learning curve to position you for future growth as an upcoming intern or employee.

Retry For That Dream Job!

You’ve reflected on your experience, kept in touch with your former interviewers and maintained a positive outlook. It’s time to cash in on your upskilling! You already know the pace and vibe of the internship or job interview, and you can expect the type of questions asked. You’re now better prepared for the interview and you’ll be showing more interest in the role if you stay loyal to applying for the role. Don’t give up on your passions!

Final Takeaways

There isn’t any use in beating yourself up after receiving a rejection letter for job applications. Adopt a positive outlook and consider your shortcomings as an opportunity to reflect and grow, and you’ll be better prepared for future interviews. You did well enough to pass their preliminary recruitment stages so you’ll definitely have a greater chance the next time and are one step closer to getting your dream internship or job!

Professionalism at Your Internship

Tips on Professionalism at your Internship

Your conduct during your internship says a lot more about you than you may think. Professionalism in the workplace is a valuable trait for any business, whether you’re working in a corporate office, a construction site, or a manufacturing site. Getting the job done is one thing, but maintaining appropriate formalities is a completely different feat you need to keep track of. During your internship, you will need to synthesise professional behaviour into your roles to impress and assure your supervisors and co-workers are aware of your merit. So how exactly can you practice this trait? How can you meet the expectations of your organisation by being viewed as a professional in any given internship work environment? This article will give you all the tips and tricks you’ll need to enhance your work behaviour during your internship.

Tips on Professionalism at your Internship

Be Respectful

The first rule is to be respectful towards others, in order to be seen as respectable, yourself. You might not agree with the opinions or actions of some of your co-workers, but you must do your best to remain respectful and engage in healthy and constructive conversations instead of airing out negative and personal thoughts. The last thing you’d want is to be perceived as immature and unprofessional, which may lead to other unfair assumptions being made about you – not good impressions you would want to make as an intern. Giving everyone time to speak while you listen attentively or going out of your way to do good deeds around the workplace will show your colleagues that you’re thoughtful and considerate of others, which are respectable traits to demonstrate whilst at your internship. Treating everyone equally and respecting the code of conduct in your company will also show an elevated sense of maturity.

Tips on Professionalism at your Internship

Don’t Be Late

Be punctual! Professionals don’t come into the office late and make excuses. You must take accountability in your punctuality and make it a priority to arrive on time for all meetings and projects. The same apply in etiquette for both employees and interns. There is no such thing as an unreliable professional! Showing up on time to work is the bare minimum of your supervisor’s expectations, and clocking in at the right time will prove to your colleagues that you value their time, especially if your punctuality affects them (e.g. meetings or discussions). Take it a step further and try starting work ahead of time by coming in a few minutes early. Sacrificing just a couple minutes of your morning to come in early (with lots of coffee) during your internship, will certainly impress your supervisors, and is definitely worth a sacrifice!

Appropriate Dress Attire

To act the part, you also must dress the part. Even as an intern! Whatever the dress attire requirements are for your workplace, it’s best to follow these expectations to maintain professionalism.

This means no flip flops at the construction site, and ripped jeans at the office. You’ll want to stay neat and clean with your outfits and don’t neglect to iron out any wrinkles and kinks before leaving the house. Have a look at how your co-workers dress to mirror the vibe if there is no dress code. Coming to work is not a fashion show (unless you literally work in a business that requires some glitz and glam), so save the tank tops and platform heels for a night out. Dressing the part effectively may even boost your confidence so you can elevate your professional attitude – even just as an intern. But if you’re ever in doubt, don’t be shy to ask your supervisor or co-workers at the beginning of or during your internship.

Offer Assistance to Your Co-workers

You’re a team player in any job. True professionals are considerate of others and will always lend a hand before people have to ask. We all face challenges at work so be empathetic and assist anyone who may be struggling. Being a professional isn’t just an ‘act’ when you walk through the doors of your workplace, it’s a state of mind which includes being caring, compassionate and selfless in every aspect of your life. Part of the benefits of being an intern is the fresh and exciting insights you will be able to impart on the organisation – whether this be knowledge from your studies or previous work experience. So don’t be afraid of sharing your time, knowledge and perspective with others, especially because you know you’d want people to help you when you need it most.

Don’t Gossip

Work drama and gossip is a rabbit hole you don’t want to get trapped in. Talking down on your co-workers not only raises a lot of doubt surrounding your integrity and respectability, but also encourages unlikeable high school behaviour. You should save any scandalous news for outsiders and avoid being the person who spreads rumours at your internship. In a professional workplace, you should be uplifting towards your co-workers instead of stifling their performance ability by evoking anxiety with gossip.

Work Area Cleanliness

Your workspace should be a reflection of you. Keeping a tidy desk or locker, for instance, will help you keep organised in your responsibilities and you’ll seem to be put together even if you aren’t. Take time every day to sort through your belongings and file all your documents so you don’t have to sift through a pile of items when you are in urgent need of it. Being conscious of your cleanliness will improve and complement your professionalism during your internship.

Tips on Professionalism at your Internship

Stay Positive

Workplace negativity can be very toxic and contagious. Having a positive attitude will rub off on everyone else and exponentially enhance your workplace culture. Being a positive intern will help you hone a professional energy and encourage you to work hard and influence others better. A positive outlook is extremely advantageous so don’t underestimate how much putting on a smile can do for you at your internship.

Non-productive habits such as regular complaining will drop the morale among employees and reduce job satisfaction- neither consequences will be of any benefit to you, so avoid unnecessary complaints and tension. A bad mood is most like a projection of something that happened outside of the office so leave the negative attitude at the door before you walk in. In these cases, separate your personal life from your work life and don’t take out your frustrations on supervisors, customers or co-workers who warranted none of it. If you’re not feeling your best due to complications at work which you can’t fix, consider taking a break if you aren’t feeling fulfilled.

Final Takeaways

Being a professional in the workplace takes more than just playing pretend. You’ve got to look, act and feel the part in every aspect of your life beyond the office. Honing in your skills and values like communication, initiative, respect and positivity will make a great impression on others during your internship and set an even better standard for your co-workers to mirror in their work life.

Why You Should Intern in a Start-Up

Every successful company began as a simple start-up. As university-level students, you have every opportunity to be a part of the growth and development of a future company by applying for internships. The small-scale structure of start-ups means that their work culture, hierarchy and job tasks will differ from the complex operations and management of mature businesses. Interning at a start-up will reward you with unique experiences and advantages to benefit your career path! A few pros that go with these internships include being exposed to more strategic decision making and creating more enriching contributions to the business’ mission. The flattened hierarchy and reduced formalities might even mean you’ll have more fun than a typical corporate internship.

Gain Real-World Experience

Interning at a start-up can offer you much more range in responsibilities to consolidate gaps in the workforce. You may just be entering the workforce but your job won’t just be crunching numbers and observing business discussions, instead, you will take on projects and tasks typically assigned to qualified professionals. There is a lot of room for self-learning and advanced coursework you’ll be expected to complete.

benefits of interning at a start-up

It is important to note that you, as an intern are no less significant than a permanent employee within a start-up. Your ideas and perspective are crucial to the growth of the business and will go a very long way, regardless of your position on the management hierarchy.

Develop your Entrepreneurial Skills

Start-up interns will be in direct communications with the empowering entrepreneurship and self-starter nature of the young business. By taking on this mentality and learning the ropes of how start-ups function, interns can apply this knowledge onto their personal projects and bring life to their own entrepreneurial ideas. This takes a talent of being resourceful and asking the internal team for feedback and constructive criticism, but in the long term, will serve them well in their career path.

start-up internship

Learn Cross-Departmental Skills

Unlike large multi-national companies with distinctive departments and separate management teams, start-ups operate with much more cross-team collaboration. Within small businesses, projects and discussions are open to all staff to deliver some input, to enrich their operating systems. This cross-team collaborative work is especially helpful to interns because it exposes you to high-level discussions about the financial, management, operations and marketing components within your start-up. By collating effort to bring teams together and enable cross-department teamwork, interns are able to work closely with professionals from a variety of fields and academic or professional backgrounds. This is a great networking opportunity for interns to cut across departments and work on new, unfamiliar tasks which can only develop your fieldwork knowledge. This collapsed hierarchical structure also entails the intern to work closely with the directorship or executive team, giving you rare glimpses into the senior decisions made at the top of the start-up organisation.

Increase Visibility of Your Contributions

As an intern, having highly regarded tasks assigned to you, makes you much more visible as a valuable team member to those at the top of the organisation. The extent of your responsibilities, combined with consistent collaborative work across departments is a very attractive quality to demonstrate to higher-ups. This is advantageous in plenty of ways! While you practice your industry skills, discussion and decision-making skills, you will also be heightening your reputation and appraisals within the industry.  The increased visibility upon your work is a unique benefit to interning at a start-up because being surrounded by such a tight-knit work community allows you to participate in more one-on-one mentoring sessions with your supervisor and opens a much more relaxed and casual feedback loop with your colleagues to help you improve your industry skills and knowledge. Unlike the management system in large companies, you’re more than just a number at a start-up- you will gain access to much more personalised and hands-on experiences! So take your time and show your passion for the work you do as an intern to truly shine amongst the staff, and you’ll make great impressions and expand your network consequently.

Refreshing Work Culture

It’s not to say that start-ups take their work less seriously than large corporate businesses, but start-ups typically have a stronger focus on fostering a fun and enjoyable work culture. You might see regular office events such as happy hour drinks at a local bar, office parties or Christmas dinners. This is all to ensure the staff remains happy, refreshed and well connected with one another to stimulate fresher ideas and discussions to improve the start-up. Interns are invited to all these social events to help them integrate into the workplace and help them gain better connections. You’re welcome to take part in fun activities and friendly competitions with your co-workers as a way to stay efficient, motivated and boost the overall business-wide collaboration. Doing your part as interns will include socialising! You’ll ultimately fuel your ambitions more by immersing yourself in the work culture and it’ll only further motivate you to achieve your career goals.

interning at a start-up

 Opportunity for On-going Work

One of the most exciting aspects of interning at a start-up, aside from listing it on your resume, is being an attractive candidate for long term employment! With all the extra workload and transferable cross-department knowledge you picked up along the journey, you’ll have many more accomplishments and skills than perhaps an intern from an established multinational company. Your chance of landing a long-term employment contract is greater increased by how you are already familiar with the business, how it operates and its staff. After months of the placement, you’ve been trained up to be the right fit for their team by having the necessary key skills and insights and hence your employer is more inclined to offer you a future job with growth opportunities. Don’t forget, start-ups, if run effectively, are expected to grow and expand in the future, so your career journey with the start-up can only prosper in accordance to that potential. Nurturing a fond relationship with the start-up as an intern is highly advantageous!

Final Takeaways

There is a lot to be learnt from interning at a start-up, especially when you are finding your ‘in’ into the workforce. Engaging with a small business can be highly enriching because it offers a diverse array of opportunities including exposure to real-world experience and cross-department insight. Fostering a strong relationship with your colleagues also gives you access to consultations, impressive networks and long-term employment opportunities. Applying for internships may seem daunting, but trust us, you’ll find it to be one of the most rewarding experiences to kickstart your career journey!

How to Impress Your Co-Workers as an Intern

During your Internship, you will develop a range of skills, build on your resume with great and relevant experience, and have an amazing opportunity to work with professionals in your industry. But above all, you will be getting your foot in the door at a company and industry you are interested in, and increasing your chances of attaining full-time work in the future.

As we know, first impressions and positively impressing on your co-workers is important. Being the “newbie” intern in the office might be intimidating but it doesn’t have to be! We have compiled a list of tips to consider to develop your interpersonal communication and by extension, strengthen your organisational and management skills as an intern.

Arrive at Work Early and Ready to Work

For the normal 9-5 jobs, it isn’t much to spare an extra five to ten minutes at the start and end of your workday to arrive at work early and leave late. This little detail will simultaneously impact your schedule minimally whilst showing your co-workers or managers your enthusiasm for your role – great brownie points to collect as an intern.

Intern impressing employer

If it is your first day in your internship, it is highly recommended to arrive early to your orientation to ensure you don’t miss any crucial paperwork or directions. In addition, time-related stress can be reduced by giving you the extra minutes to complete your daily tasks and train you to work/time-manage more efficiently.

Dress to Impress

How you dress or present yourself in your internship to your colleagues will make an impression before you exchange words. Wearing the appropriate clothes, be it uniforms or by a strict dress code, is crucial to impressing others – especially as an intern. Don’t forget to choose clean, coordinated clothes and iron them before leaving your house. Consider the level of formality at work and buy clothing that is both comfortable and relatively formal. It helps to imagine where you want to be in the long-run in your career – what role is it? What would you wear in that position? With that, select the appropriate smart outfit that dresses the part- embrace the age-old maxim of “faking it ‘til you make it”!

Business intern

Make a Lasting Impression at the First Meet

A strong handshake, warm smile and confident attitude can help you win your co-workers over. People will appreciate you remembering names, job roles and positions, which is an effective strategy to show you pay close attention which psychologically appeals to people. Take on this advice and introduce yourself to people as frequently as possible (without accidentally re-introducing yourself) such as anyone you meet standing near the coffee maker or at the printer. These extroverted qualities allow you to practice being more outgoing and approachable, as you avoid awkward silences.

It helps build your commanding presence if you have an introduction speech prepared before greeting people. For example, you might use the following prompts throughout a greeting:

  • “Hi my name is Jane, I’m the new intern, what’s your name?
  • What is your job title? I’d love to hear more about what your role entails!
  • Do you know where can I find the best breakfast food near this office?
  • I can’t wait to share ideas and work more closely with you!”

Think of this as an elevator pitch about yourself. Preparing prompts for one-on-one or group meetings will break down social barriers and show your leadership skills to your co-workers. Of course, give your colleagues time to speak so that you are not overtaking the conversation. Prove your interest in their background and ideas by listening intently while asking them questions too.

Nurturing a relationship with your co-workers in a new workplace is especially important as an intern. Don’t forget, during your Internship, you can benefit from learning about other roles and industries – you might find that you have a likening to it.

Positive Body Language

As long as you maintain confident body language in your internship, your colleagues are much more receptive to your ideas or opinions. It is as simple as practising a poised posture, making eye contact or other minor body language cues that suggest your attentive listening and assertive speaking ability.

The schedule of working 9 – 5 for an intern might be gruelling if it is your first work experience Positive body language can also be used as a disguise on the days you feel unusually unenthusiastic or energetic- utilising affirmative non-verbal signs during conversation or interaction can reduce the need for verbal actions. This means your colleagues will see your slumpy appearance before they acknowledge anything profound you may say. So sit up straight and chin up!

Organise Your Work Schedule

Plan out your day with a daily planner or curated timetable which prevents you from forgetting important events or deadlines during your internship. Your co-workers would especially appreciate it if you were on top of your tasks and team assignments or were punctual to business meetings. Having a schedule will allow you to complete your work timely and demonstrate your reliability and top-notch organisational skills to your colleagues. This will enable you to work consistently throughout the day or week, at a sustainable pace which won’t overwhelm you with work. In addition to reducing your workload in the short and long term, you will find yourself rushing projects less and building excellent work etiquette for the future.

Take the Initiative in Business Projects

By simply holding a pen and paper to take notes during business meetings, or by offering to organise the online drive for team assignments, you have boasted your potential as a participative and reliable team member or co-worker. Little actions can add a lot of value to your work culture.

Meeting at host company

During meetings, you must speak up and voice your ideas or concerns and help guide conversations into more productive or relevant subject matters – all opinions are valid and will show excellent intern enthusiasm and initiative.

Organising schedule

Be Proactive and Offer Help to Your Colleagues

If you can spare anytime during your internship days, it is a good opportunity to offer your help and guidance to your co-workers who might be struggling to meet deadlines. Instead of kicking back and putting your feet up on the table, be proactive and lend a hand to your colleagues in case they need help. This will show not only you taking initiative but you are competent for extra work. As your industry experience builds as an intern, so will your reputation as a real team player.

Contribute to a Healthy Work Culture

With management hierarchy flattening in many businesses, a democratic approach is the alternative, with each employee being responsible for the overall atmosphere and environment in their workplace. To help keep your workplace buzzing and positive, you can contribute by making friendly suggestions to encourage productive workflows such as incorporating plants or a ‘Bring Your Pet to Work Day’ which are both lively concepts as well as refreshing changes to the business work culture.

Learn From Your Mistakes

You may make a mistake during your internship – but don’t fret. Truth is, no one is perfect – even those who are Managers, CEO’s or Director’s, and that’s okay! Internships are learning experiences and allow you to gain industry skills in a safe work environment. If a mistake is made, your colleagues will understand as long as you can take accountability and responsibility for any corrections you must make. Instead of feeling sorry for yourself, you must take on constructive criticism from your co-workers to grow from your mistakes and not make the same ones twice. People will be pleased to see your growth after any accidents while you can continue to take positive steps forward in your career by being mature and rectifying your own mistakes.

If you take on these tips, your chances of impressing your co-workers will be maximised. Having read the advice provided, the skills and knowledge you gain from your internships are transferable to all other aspects of your work life such as productivity or organisation. So, practice working well alongside others and you will soon see the vast array of benefits!

How to Answer Marketing Internship Interview Questions

Marketing interns are involved in the development and publishing of brand campaigns and marketing services. Companies hosting internship programs strive to aid students in nurturing their skills and experience to create young marketing professionals with the chops to perform administrative duties in market research and brand development. To ensure they choose the best candidate to add to their team, however, is a rigorous and structured process where interviewees for the internship position are challenged with field-specific interview questions.

Recruiters are looking for the ideal candidate who has the talents to assist in various stages of creating marketing material. Your responses must demonstrate your knowledge of marketing techniques and specific industry skills. You may receive questions on social media managing, advertisement designs or distribution channels. Your answers must be tailored to specifically hone in your understanding of each area by using buzzwords to signal your marketing aptitude to the interviewer, as well as discuss your exceptional interpersonal and technical skills. This article will outline some commonly asked marketing internship interview questions with the helpful tips and sample responses you can gain inspiration from to ace your meetings with prospective employers.

marketing interview

Common Marketing Intern Interview Questions:

Regarding the Company:
1. What is your knowledge of our company’s demographic and target audience?
2. What kind of relationship do you think we as a business, have with our audience?
3. Are you familiar with our brand?
4. What do you know about the role?
5. Do you have a favourite marketing campaign that was launched by our company?

These questions are the perfect opportunity to flaunt your understanding and familiarity of the brand, to show recruiters that you are compatible with the environment and culture of their brand. To prepare for these questions, don’t hold back from stalking the business’s social media accounts, websites, and previous advertisement launches. To really stand out from other candidates, challenge yourself to familiarise information about the company’s competitors too to give the interviewer your own take on how you would upstage competitors and help the company attract new loyal customers.

Your response should open a two-way dialogue with the recruiters to enquire more about the company whilst sharing your knowledge of it. It’s a great idea to ask questions after each of your talking points to engage your employer and involve them in a discussion, as opposed to sticking by a mundane interview atmosphere.

Sample response:
I have always admired the way in which your business used social media to promote your products and services. Your social media strategy and Facebook ad campaigns have shown great success as your online audience growth has directly correlated to your exponential sales. I can appreciate how your company has kept a consistent theme and tone to attract your target audience of younger women through a thematic aesthetic and ethical message to promote your feminine products. Particularly, I felt very empowered by your ‘Sunrise Run’ campaign which motivated your audience to take care of their health and wellbeing whilst boosting your social media interaction by asking them to use the hashtag #sunriserun to attract new customers. I wish to be a part of this sort of uplifting marketing development in future.

common marketing intern interview

Operational Questions:

1. What inspired you to pursue this marketing internship?
2. Do you have a plan for the future in a marketing career?
3. What about marketing motivates you?
4. List three skills you think are most essential to this role.
5. What was the most recent marketing book you’ve read? How do you consume information?
6. What do you hope to gain from this marketing internship?
7. What are your favourite classes at school?

For these questions, you should link your career aspirations with the needs of the company in which you are interviewing for. It’s a prompt to share your strengths and interests which align with the key competencies required in the job description for the internship. These responses should include an elaboration on your core skills such as how you work under pressure, what creative and innovative tactics you know, your data analysis and problem-solving capability, your interpersonal and teamwork skills, and your drive to work towards targets. You want your passions and motivations to be clear and obvious to employers because your emotional connection to the job role will be very attractive to the employer.

To answer these open-ended questions, you can tell a story or an anecdote about how you came to be passionate about your career choices in marketing. It can attain to what you’ve been taught in school, you volunteer experience, or what you learnt at a previous job.

Sample response:
‘I’ve always had an affiliation to the creative aspect of business, and a strong artistic inclination which inspires me to take on design projects. I started a business while juggling a part-time job and studying in university which has taught me the necessary real-world experience I needed to reach my target audience through effective content creation and advertisement campaigns on the internet. These experiences both in school and extracurriculars have reinforced time and time again why I have such an appreciation for marketing in its’ storytelling and socialising capability. I’m very excited to work with your teams at this company to produce top quality marketing assignments and further my career in the social media management field.’

Role-specific questions

1. What components of a digital campaign are most important?
2. What trends in digital marketing are gaining traction?
3. Tell us what experience you have in mobile marketing.
4. What experience do you have in content marketing and SEO?
5. Describe what innovative social media strategies you might suggest to develop our company’s brand.

business

Role-specific questions enable you to mention more special marketing skills on your resume. It’ll help your recruiter visualise how you act in a professional setting and lets them know how much additional training you will need. Interns often come across steep learning curves so role-specific internship questions will allow employers to gauge your level of understanding and proficiency in specific areas of marketing such as brand awareness, managing software systems or industry platforms.

Sample Response:
While at university, and at my previous internship program, I became very proficient in using WordPress, Twitter, Google analytics and Salesforce amongst other social media platforms and digital media programs. In my previous SEO work portfolio, I took charge of written content creation as well as managing social media channels to expand the audience of my website links. I learnt to maximise website traffic, build links, increase online quote completions and create meta descriptions. The content marketing strategies and skills I mastered in the past year have really taught me the significance of user-generated content by boosting engagement, reach and leads, which I hope to apply to my work at your company if you give me the chance. My advanced ability to streamline industry practices makes me a great candidate for your program.

Final Notes

The first step to being accepted for a marketing internship program is to ace your internship interview. Constantly pay attention to the news and form unique opinions in regard to marketing and advertising campaigns to enrich your conversation with your employers. Having the correct, informed insights will be your key into the industry. Keep your responses clear, succinct, honest and well-stated. With these tools and tips, you’re ready for your interview! Put on a collared shirt and your best shoes- we at Premium Graduate wish you all the best of luck!

How to Write an Internship Cover Letter

You’re on the hunt for relevant experience in your field of study, and you’ve found the perfect internship. The next step would be to apply by sending the employer of the host company your cover letter and resume. Most students will overlook the importance of an internship cover letter and mistakenly think the hiring agent will only be interested in their resume; but to stand out and give yourself a better chance of succeeding, you must perceive your cover letter as an opportunity to prove yourself as the best candidate for the role.

When applying for a position in the ‘real world’, you’re expected to have a few substantial qualifications in your toolkit. However, as someone seeking an internship, you are most likely limited to experiences you’ve had within the classroom. To get around this, your cover letter will outline the key transferable skills and experiences you’ve developed throughout your tertiary education, which best fit your role. This article will detail what information, format and formalities you need in your letter to capture the attention of prospective employees.

write an internship cover letter

Using the Appropriate Letter Format

Internship cover letters are typically in a business letter format. This entails a proper structure including your name, contact details and date at the top of the page, followed by the contact information of the employer you are addressing. For letters via email, you can opt to place your contact information in your email signature to hone in a professional touch.

The conventions of a business format for internship letters is to cap your body of text to four brief paragraphs. You should expect the employer to only skim this letter so it should be easy to navigate and scanned over within a matter of 10-30 seconds- clear and concise paragraphs will do the trick for encompassing all the necessary points you need to make. For efficiency’s sake, follow this checklist to maximise the potential of your cover letter.

1. Your contact information
2. Company and employer’s contact information
3. Salutations: Formally address the hiring agent or host company
4. Paragraph #1: State your application and introduce yourself
5. Paragraph #2: Share your relevant skills and coursework to qualify yourself
6. Paragraph #3: Align your goals, interests and values with the company
7. Paragraph #4: Call to action
8. Outro: Sign off

state your application

This being said, many industries appreciate creative flair shown through cover letters and resumes such as in marketing or design fields- if this is relevant to you, feel free to modify and tweak this structure to demonstrate some artistic aptitude. Adjust the structure or reconstruct it to your own discretion, as it gives you an opportunity to visually express your talents beyond stating them through words on a page. It’s a simple but impactful strategy to grab the attention of your reader whilst emphasising your awareness of the field and tactical thinking. The most striking internship cover letters will lend to a perfect balance between personality and professionalism.

PARAGRAPH 1: State Your Application

The paragraphs throughout this letter will be brief and dense with information. After introducing your name, education level, majors and/or school, this first section should highlight the specific role you are applying for (e.g. civil engineering internship at Roadcross Inc.). The aim is to convince your hiring agent that you have not just submitted a generic cover letter that you’ve copy-pasted into a couple of other emails to different companies. Hiring agents normally juggle with countless job applications for a variety of job positions, so you should provide this contextual evidence to make their job easier and appeal to them. Give the impression that you have given their job listing a lot of thought and consideration by tailoring this headlining address to the specific company.
This opening paragraph should also make mention of how you discovered the internship listing. Hiring agents and employers are very interested in knowing which job posting channel they employ is most effective in reaching candidates.

PARAGRAPH 2: List Relevant Coursework and Skills

It is understandable for most students to have little to no job experience to beef up their resumes or internship cover letters. So don’t fret! Describing your relevant coursework can be just as valuable to employers. Perhaps you can share relevant subjects or projects you’ve completed at university, or any accomplishments/awards you were acknowledged for to prove your talents. Emphasising your academic experience will imply you possess a set of particular skills which the company can help develop.
You can also try including your extracurricular experiences such as volunteer work or ‘shadowing’ experience because these count as ‘real world’ fieldwork. Having these relevant accounts of fieldwork will tell employers a lot about what you are familiar with and they can imply the level of writing/ interpersonal/ business planning skills you can offer to enrich their company.
Even without professional or long-term industry experience, you have a multitude of relevant transferable skills to boast as expertise or relevant knowledge fit for an internship.

Woman

PARAGRAPH 3: Align Your Goals and Interests

To truly prove you’re the best fit for the internship role, you need to align your values, beliefs and passions with that of the company. Summarise the values you share with the company, ensuring you are emphasising the fact the company’s needs and demands are also your priority to satisfy to the best of your ability. It helps to review the internship posting to seek out what the employer looks for in a candidate to understand what the company’s overarching values and goals are.
In the same paragraph, include a description of what you would like to gain from the internship, branching off from what your goals and vision are for taking on an internship at the company. Employers offer internship programs with the intention to upskill, network and build the experience of their students; after explaining what you’re offering in return, make a note in your cover letter of what you wish to learn throughout the internship.

PARAGRAPH 4: Call to Action and Follow Up

The final paragraph should provoke or engage the most with the reader by requesting their response or interaction with you. Your call to action should look like you are scheduling a follow-up or call with the hiring agent for further information.

At this point, it is a good idea to review your letter and check if you have peppered in the right number of keywords or buzzwords drawn from the job advertisement to draw the recruiter’s eyes to the relevant professional information you have provided. It’s an effective strategy to make your internship cover letter seem more put together and individualised.

Outro

Sign off with a statement to express your gratitude for the opportunity they are offering and interest in attending an interview. This outro must be kept short; one sentence at most. Your closing remark should be sincere and be as short and sweet as possible to not deter attention from your body of text.
Your internship cover letter is almost done! Read over it a few more times to proofread and make sure you’ve kept your points direct and targetted. Ask a relative or friend for a new perspective and feedback. You’re all set after that! Good luck with your internship application and submission!

Intern Tips: Your First Day

Whether you’re the newbie in the office or just simply trying to uphold a good image of yourself, it is important to learn to impress your co-workers. To form a strong connection with others, consider the following tips which develop your interpersonal communication and by extension, strengthen your organisational and management skills.

Arrive at Work Early and Ready to Work

For the normal 9-5 jobs, it isn’t much to spare an extra five to ten minutes at the start and end of your workday to arrive at work early and leave late. This little detail will simultaneously impact your schedule minimally whilst showing your co-workers or managers your enthusiasm for your role. If it is your first day in a new job location, it is highly recommended to arrive early to your orientation to ensure you don’t miss any

Intern Tips 3

crucial paperwork or directions. In addition, time-related stress can be reduced by giving you the extra minutes to complete your daily tasks and train you to work/time-manage more efficiently.

Dress to Impress

How you dress or present yourself in your business attire to your colleagues will make an impression before you exchange words. Wearing the appropriate clothes, be it uniforms or by a strict dress code, is crucial to impressing others. Don’t forget to choose clean, coordinated clothes and iron them before leaving your house. Consider the level of formality at work and buy clothing that is both comfortable and relatively formal. It helps to imagine you had already gained that promotion, so you should select the appropriate smart outfit that dresses the part- embrace the age-old maxim of ‘faking it til’ you make it!

Arrive at Work Early and Ready to Work

Make a Lasting Impression at the First Meet

A strong handshake, warm smile and confident attitude can help you win over your co-workers. People will appreciate you remembering names, job roles and positions, which is an effective strategy to show you pay close attention which psychologically appeals to people. Take on this advice and introduce yourself to people as frequently as possible (without accidentally re-introducing yourself) such as anyone you meet standing near the coffee maker or at the printer. These extroverted qualities allow you to practice being more outgoing and approachable, as you avoid awkward silences.

It helps build your commanding presence if you have an introduction speech prepared before greeting people. For example, you might use the following prompts throughout a greeting,


“Hi my name is Jane, what’s your name?
What do you do?
Where can I find the best breakfast food near this office?
I can’t wait to share ideas and work more closely with you!”

Think of this as an elevator pitch about yourself. Preparing prompts for one-on-one or group meetings will break down social barriers and show your leadership skills to your co-workers. Of course, give your colleagues time to speak so that you are not overtaking the conversation. Prove your interest in their background and ideas by listening intently while asking them questions too.

Nurturing a relationship with your co-workers in a new workplace is especially encouraging to employees who may be threatened by new people. As long as you are sympathetic to people and sincerely express your excitement or gratitude towards working beside brilliant people, your co-workers will have a positive impression of you.

Make a Lasting Impression at the First Meet

Positive Body Language

As long as you maintain confident body language, your colleagues are much more receptive to your ideas or opinions. It is as simple as practising a poised posture, making eye contact or other minor body language cues that suggest your attentive listening and assertive speaking ability. Positive body language can also be used as a disguise on the days you feel unusually unenthusiastic or energetic- utilising affirmative non-verbal signs during conversation or interaction can reduce the need for verbal actions. This means your colleagues will see your slumpy appearance before they acknowledge anything profound you may say. So sit up straight and chin up!

Organise Your Work Schedule

Plan out your day with a daily planner or curated timetable which prevents you from forgetting important events or deadlines. Your co-workers would especially appreciate it if you were on top of your team assignments or were punctual to business meetings.


Having a schedule will allow you to complete your work timely and demonstrate your reliability and top-notch organisational skills to your colleagues. This will enable you to work consistently throughout the day or week, at a sustainable pace which won’t overwhelm you with work. In addition to reducing your workload in the short and long term, you will find yourself rushing projects less and hamper the possibility of a promotion.

Take the Initiative in Business Projects

By simply holding a pen and paper to take notes during business meetings, or by offering to organise the online drive for team assignments, you have boasted your potential as a participative and reliable team member or co-worker. Little actions can add a lot of value to your work culture. During meetings, you must speak up and voice your ideas or concerns and help guide conversations into more productive or relevant subject matters. It is okay to take a dominant role if you are confident and well versed on the topic of conversation!

Be Proactive and Offer Help to Your Colleagues

If you can spare anytime, it is a good opportunity to offer your help and guidance to your co-workers who might be struggling to meet deadlines. Instead of kicking back and putting your feet up on the table, be proactive and lend a hand to your colleagues in case they need help. This will show not only you taking initiative but you are competent for extra work. As your volunteering experience builds, so will your reputation as a real team player. Your supervisor and staffers will likely see your potential in higher job roles and this could open up the possibility of promotions or rewards for you.

Contribute to a Healthy Work Culture

As the management hierarchy flattens in many businesses which embrace a democratic approach, each employee is responsible for the overall atmosphere and environment in

Take the Initiative in Business Projectsn


their workplace. To help keep your workplace buzzing and positive, you can contribute by making friendly suggestions to encourage productive workflows such as incorporating plants or a ‘Bring Your Pet to Work Day” which are both lively concepts as well as refreshing changes to the business work culture.

Learn From Your Mistakes

You will inevitably get something wrong no matter how hard you try. Truth is, no one is perfect and you are bound to get something wrong, but that’s okay! Your colleagues will understand as long as you can take accountability and responsibility for any corrections you must make. Instead of feeling sorry for yourself, you must take on constructive criticism from your co-workers to grow from your mistakes and not make the same ones twice. People will be pleased to see your growth after any accidents while you can continue to take positive steps forward in your career by being mature and rectifying your own mistakes.
If you take on these tips, your chances of impressing your co-workers will maximise and even grant you the opportunity to apply for a promotion or other work-related bonuses. Having read the advice provided, the skills and knowledge you gain are transferable to all other aspects of your work life such as productivity or organisation. So, practice working well alongside others and you will soon see the vast array of benefits!

How To Answer Behavioural Questions

How To Answer Behavioural Questions

Behavioural questions can help prospective employers make positive assumptions about how your past experiences have helped you gain the correct skills and knowledge to apply to new or advanced job roles. For this reason, these stylistic questions are a great prompt in job interviews to test how you may solve problems for future hypothetical scenarios and allow employers to assess your candidacy appropriately. By detailing specific tasks and your responses to real world business obstacles, your interviewer can effectively gauge how well you complement the workplace whilst giving you ample time to position yourself as the ideal candidate. After reading this article, you’ll realise job interviews should not have to feel like an interrogation, because competency-based questions are an opportunity for you to flaunt your relevant industry experience, interpersonal and technical skills!

STAR Method

The STAR method is a widely practiced structural device for tackling behavioural questions. It stands for Situation, Task, Action and Result. This answering technique can encompass all the key points and details of your experience in a well-structured response to avoid circumlocution or rambling.

For the Situation aspect, briefly recount the scenario with highlights of relevant moments or challenges you faced. In Task, describe your role and how it contributed to the project or assignment. For Action, explain and assess your response to the situation you were faced with; how did you manage your team, how fast was your response time, how did you readjust to the situation? The Result component refers to evaluating the outcome of your actions and preferably any measurements of your success.

Using this method as a guide will streamline your response and interviewers will appreciate you saving their time by having a clear and concise flow. It is highly recommended you employ this structure as a scaffold for behavioural questions!

Be Candid

Learning to keep it light-hearted in a professional setting is an artform. So long as you moderate the use of humour and storytelling, you’ll increase your chances of engaging with the interviewer exponentially. It’s always great to be candid in your response to behavioural questions because they encourage you to share a personal experience in order to express your personality to employees. You’re welcome to bring humour into it because these modes of expression are a great way to demonstrate honesty and transparency.

To practice this, you can accustom yourself to thinking aloud. Most hiring employers love to know how you think because they have a tough decision to choose the candidate their most confident with. Especially in technical roles such as software engineering, your interviewer will greatly appreciate your thought process regarding how you’d troubleshoot computational errors and other solutions you can think up. Don’t forget in interview situations, it is just as much an open dialogue between you and the interviewer, as it is an internal dialogue you have with yourself!

Be Prepared

This step is absolutely crucial to standing out from other candidates. You won’t have any luck walking into any interview without being equipped for questions that are specifically targeted at your knowledge of the company’s current demands. You’ll need to be prepared in multiple areas regarding the company, the role, your qualifications and experiences.

The Company and the Role

Before you step foot into the interview room, you should expect to be asked about your understanding of the company and the role you have applied for. It becomes a lot easier once you know enough about the company’s mission and operations, to be able to market yourself as the perfect complement to their business. Review the job listing to know exactly what they seek in the ideal candidate and familiarise yourself with their requirements.

Link Your Qualifications to the Job

After reviewing the company’s needs and the requirements in the job posting, you are able to brainstorm the qualifications and skills you have which are relevant. The behavioural skills you possess should match closely with the job description, and you’ll be able to weave in your skillset into your responses about the company’s demands.

Brainstorm Experiences

Listing a few anecdotal references is the most effective way to convey your experience and capability in an engaging manner. It’s best to think of more than three main professional situations in which you encountered a meaningful challenge or achievement. Interviewers want you to prove yourself as a successful candidate by aligning your experiences to specific job tasks so they can envision you as the right fit for their company. By having the appropriate anecdotes up your sleeve, you’ll feel much more prepared to tackle behavioural questions. For the most impact, think of professional scenarios where you were prevalently involved in the resolution process and what your key takeaways were from the overall journey.

Teamwork Experience

Most of the behavioural questions used by interviewers will be targeted at your aptitude as a member of a team. Teamwork is vital to the coordination of every company and how communication channels are built across the organisation because they depend on collaborative roles to succeed. Employers prize a candidate who exhibits ‘team player’ skills.

For questions based on teamwork experience, you should think of a successful assignment you achieved within a professional group setting. It could be a work project, a university presentation, or a case competition you placed in. For these anecdotes, focus on your interpersonal skills and how you approached task delegation, collaborative work and collective responsibilities.

Resolving Conflict

Prospective employers are constantly assessing your communication skills, as banal as it sounds. Regarding common behavioural questions which test your conflict resolve, you’ll need to prepare experiences in which you faced disagreement within a professional environment. Your goal is to think of a situation involving negotiation, compromise and mediation. How you handle grievances or collaborative challenges is evaluated through how you represent the situation. Don’t ‘trash’ anyone! There isn’t a need to put down others for mistakes being made because that’s natural. To show maturity and resolve, you can instead focus on how you viewed the conflict as a learning opportunity to rectify concerns and ultimately enrich everyone involved. Think of how you have improved the quality of work for your co-workers, peers and the company overall.

Key Takeaways

To ace behavioural questions, you’ll rely on lots of preparation and confidence in your abilities. Take your time in researching, practice thinking aloud and tracking your accomplishments to elevate your responses. Having the understanding of how a company operates and how your own qualifications line up with their requirements will impress interviewers with your solution-oriented and team-player approach.

Good Luck 😊